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Sunday, April 7, 2013


7:30 AM - 4:30 PM
    Learn the essentials of managing your agency’s winter maintenance operations from the best in the business! This panel of featured conference speakers provides a well-rounded overview of all aspects of snow and ice control for individuals charged with supervising their agency’s winter maintenance operations. PARTICIPANTS WILL LEARN BEST PRACTICES IN: Policy & Planning Weather Materials Fleet & Equipment Snow Control Ice Control THE GOAL IS FOR PARTICIPANTS TO: Expand their knowledge of planning and preparation Increase their understanding of winter weather and how it affects operations Identify how to better use traditional and alternative chemicals Consider what equipment is available and how to maintain it Expand understanding of snow & ice control techniques Appreciate the environmental impacts of winter maintenance policies Stress responsible application WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Supervisors with winter maintenance responsibilities Operators who aspire to be supervisors Operators who want a greater understanding of winter maintenance processes NOTE: To obtain the certificate, participants are required to attend the entire workshop and achieve a score of 80% or higher on the test.

    Room :  207 ABCD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Explain the reasons and benefits for having a comprehensive winter operations plan
    2. Utilize modern snowfighting technologies such as anti-icing, use of chemical blends, and smart spreading.
    3. Determine the environmental impacts of the use and/ or non-use of materials in winter maintenance


    SPEAKERS:
    • Duane E. Amsler, Sr, PE
      Deceased,  Slingerlands,  NY
    • David L. Bergner, PWLF
      Principal,  Monte Vista Associates, LLC,  Mesa,  AZ
    • Diana W. Clonch
      President,  D. W. Clonch,  Columbus,  OH
    • R. Mark DeVries
      Application Expert,  Vaisala Inc,  Marengo,  IL
    • Michael D. Kennedy, PE
      Director of Transportation Maintenance and Repair,  City of Minneapolis,  Minneapolis,  MN
    • William P. Kennedy, PE
      Engr Sup- Denver Street Maintenance,  City & County of Denver CO,  Denver,  CO
    • John Klostermann
      Street/Sewer Maintenance Supv,  City of Dubuque,  Dubuque,  IA
    • Dr. Wilfrid A. Nixon, PE, PhD, PWLF
      Professor,  University of Iowa,  Iowa City,  IA
    • John Scharffbillig
      Director PW Fleet Services,  City of Minneapolis,  Minneapolis,  MN
    • Jon D. Tarleton
      Marketing Manager/Meteorologist,  Vaisala, Inc.,  Saint Louis,  MO

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    The National Traffic Incident Management Coalition was formed in 2004 to promote better communication, coordination and cooperation among the disciplines considered as responders to major accidents on the nation’s highways. Initially, the attention was on police, fire, emergency medical and towing disciplines as primary responders. However, it is now acknowledged that many traffic accidents and other disruptions happen on local streets and roads under the jurisdiction of municipal Public Works agencies. Public Works and DOTs agencies need to better understand their evolving roles and responsibilities in Traffic Incident Management (TIM). The protocols, relationships and responsibilities used with TIM are actually based on NIMS (National Incident Management System) and ICS (Incident Command System). It is possible that in certain situations Public Works/ DOT could be designated as Incident Command. The speakers are members of the National Traffic Incident Coalition and each have extensive experience in traffic incidents and other emergencies and disasters. Come learn what you need to know when it’s your turn to take the lead.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Acquire a better understanding of the role of Public Works in Traffic Incident Management and how that serves as foundation for all-hazards emergency functions.
    2. Participate in all phases of emergency management as a full and equal partner with other responder disciplines.
    3. Establish stronger working relationships with other first responder disciplines in order to develop the protocols and policies for effective performance under Incident Command and Unified Command.


    SPEAKERS:
    • James G. Austrich
      Principal Transportation Management Specialist,  Parsons Brinckerhoff,  Washington,  DC
    • David L. Bergner, PWLF
      Principal,  Monte Vista Associates, LLC,  Mesa,  AZ
    • Kimberly C. Vasconez, MPA
      MPIA Team Ldr Trf Incid&Events Mgmt,  Federal Highway Administration - DOT,  Washington,  DC

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

    This presentation will address the challenges and opportunities that are presented when Maintenance and ITS technologies are combined to provide improved traveler information. New uses of existing technologies within the maintenance, ITS, and road weather service provider areas will be discussed for use in improving traveler information and highway safety. Challenges of the project with MnDOT will also be discussed and outcomes resulting from the deployment of the project will be presented. Finally, opportunities for use of technologies used in this project by local agencies will be presented.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Describe new uses for AVL technologies
    2. Adapt existing equipment to provide new traveler information
    3. Describe how technologies can be used to improve snowplow operator safety


    SPEAKERS:
    • Benjamin Hershey
      Associate VP - Weather Services Ops,  Iteris, Inc,  Grand Forks,  ND

    Category:
    • Fleet Services
    • Engineering and Technology

    Snow events, large and small, generate interest from people within any community. How we communicate public works activities during these events will, in large part, depend upon how well we disseminate information about our activities. Dave Lawry has over 23 years’ experience in municipal public works operations with the City of Elgin, IL and Pam Broviak, currently with the City of Geneva,IL, has over 29 years of experience working with local government. Dave Lawry will provide examples of the use of social media while with the City of Elgin, and Pam Broviak will discuss the various social media outlets that can be used by your agency and by the public.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Communicate better with their constituents during an emergency response event.
    2. Employ use of social media to provide valuable updates to their community
    3. Educate their communities about use of Social Media.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Pamela A. Broviak, PE, PWLF
      Project Manager,  Illinois Dept of Transportation,  Schaumburg,  IL
    • David L. Lawry, PE
      Director of Engineering and Public Works,  Village of Schaumburg,  Schaumburg,  IL

    Category:
    • Management
    • Emergency Management

    The objective of this proposal is to provide, through a presentation, a virtual technical tour of a 24/7 Winter Maintenance Depot that features live-in staff. It will provide attendees with an urban perspective on winter maintenance operations. Of the five largest municipalities in North America, the City of Toronto receives the most snow. Dealing with large snowfall amounts in a major metropolitan area presents unique challenges to winter maintenance service providers attempting to deliver winter maintenance operations in such a way that meets the high levels of service that are set out by Council. The City of Toronto has chosen to meet this challenge through the use of Winter Maintenance Depots. A Winter Maintenance Depot features accommodations for approximately 20 live-in equipment operators. There are facilities for eating, sleeping, recreation, and administration. For equipment, there are maintenance and washing areas. There is a salt dome and area for liquid storage. Equipment Operators move into the Winter Maintenance Depot on November 1st and do not leave until April 7th. They are present in the Depot 24/7 for 5 – 7 days at a stretch The successful contractor is responsible for all activities that go on within the scope of the contract; personnel issues, roadway salting, roadway plowing, driveway windrow clearing, and bus stop clearing.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Develop a Winter Maintenance Depot
    2. Evaluate the benefits of having live-in equipment operators.
    3. Solve winter maintenance challenges in urban environment.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Dominic Guthrie
      Transportation Services,  City of Toronto,  Toronto,  ON

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice
    • Facilities

2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
    The Palmetto Commerce Parkway project in Charleston County, South Carolina was designed to achieve two primary goals: reduce traffic on the heavily congested Dorchester Road and I-26 corridors and encourage economic development and its associated employment opportunities by improving access to the Palmetto Commerce Park. Wetlands and cultural resources impacted by the project, including the Windsor Hill Plantation inland rice fields. This initiative encouraged a creative mitigation effort unlike any previously undertaken in South Carolina. While mitigation typically involves the purchase of “credits, the project team decided to approach the mitigation effort as a learning opportunity. They proposed a mitigation plan that included an internet website, contextual study, lecture series, and photographic record, which were created for use by the public. In addition, Charleston County decided to create a historical education program for use by the regional school districts in local elementary schools to teach children about South Carolina rice production. The presentation will present the case study of the Palmetto Commerce Parkway project and the associated Traveling Trunks program and will provide participants with innovative mitigation concepts to consider.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Generate new ideas for mitigation of impacts to natural and cultural resources
    2. Collaborate with local, state and federal agencies to develop educational programming for the public
    3. Explain how public works projects can be used as a learning tool


    SPEAKERS:
    • James D. Armstrong
      DEPUTY COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR,  Charleston County,  North Charleston,  SC

    Category:
    • Environment/Sustainability
    • Water / Waste Water
    • Engineering and Technology

    The Environmental Protection Agency mandate to reduce emissions for diesel engines has been in effect for a while. As this initiative progresses we are seeing a shift to the inclusion of smaller diesel engines that are used primarily in construction and grounds maintenance equipment. This session will provide a better understanding of what the requirements are, how it may affect your operation and what your next course of action should be.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Communicate a basic understanding of the requirements
    2. Identify the necessary steps that fleet departments must take to ensure compliance
    3. Determine the resources to gather more relative information


    SPEAKERS:
    • Glen L. Chrusciel
      Program Manager, Retrofit & Repower,  John Deere Power Systems,  Waterloo,  IA
    • Thomas C. Collins, PWLF
      Deputy Director,  Town of Natick,  Natick,  MA
    • Dennis R. Hogan, CAFM, CPFP
      Director of Internal Maintenance,  CRST Lincoln Sales Inc,  Cedar Rapids,  IA
    • Eric Mathewson
      Project Manager, Tier 4 Communication,  Caterpillar Inc. LC 2188,  Peoria,  IL
    • Mary Roethler
      Tier 4 Manager,  Caterpillar,  Peoria,  IL

    Category:
    • Fleet Services

    Last year, a couple uncharacteristically heavy October snow storms pummeled much of North America. The storms caused school closures, knocked out power to homes and businesses and made driving conditions difficult. The storms, which hit so early in the season that many trees had not yet lost their leaves, caused branches to snap from the weight of the snow and toppled trees onto power lines, homes, and cars. The volume of tree waste was astronomical and a huge burden on cities and towns across the country. This program will focus on how the City of Fort Collins CO and the City of Greeley, CO dealt with the abundance of tree damage from these early season storms. Included in this program are how they dealt with the damage, what and how they removed the debris and how they involved their citizens.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Increase their knowledge of how to deal with debris removal
    2. Organize how to complete the debris clean-up effort
    3. Communicate your clean-up efforts with the citizens


    SPEAKERS:
    • Jerry Pickett
      Streets Superintendent,  City of Greeley,  Greeley,  CO
    • Larry Schneider
      Streets Superintendent,  City of Fort Collins,  Fort Collins,  CO

    Category:
    • Streets, Roads and Bridges

    The winter season of 2012/13 was the inaugural year for the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS). CMAS is the partnership between Homeland Security’s FEMA, the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) and wireless carriers, to enhance public safety communications during a disaster. What can we learn from this past winter’s case studies? What, should we expect from CMAS during other severe weather emergencies? How can your public works department deliver a clear and concise message despite the glut of weather warnings and alerts available to citizens in their communities from outside sources?

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Review FEMA’s (CMAS) procedures, objectives and delivery systems regarding severe winter weather emergencies and determine how your department can incorporate that information into your communication plan.
    2. Examine Case Studies of how different communities managed public communications during the 1st winter of CMAS.
    3. Develop emergency communication strategies for consistent and clear messaging


    SPEAKERS:
    • Sara Croke
      PRESIDENT,  Weather or Not, Inc.,  Shawnee,  KS

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
    Public Works professionals (all levels) are as successful as their “detail mindedness”, just like the writer, cast and crew of a play, movie or concert. Everyone enjoys a well performed play, movie or concert, especially one wit a happy or inspiring ending. This presentation draws upon this metaphor to help the audience picture the "6 Step" process for a successful s flood fight. The “6 Step” perspective focuses on the benefits of deliberately strategizing and collaboratively conducting tactical practices to prevent flood damages. This process covers, how they can influence/utilize local, state and federal policy to better sustain readiness for their community’s “fight for its life” (citizen, facilities and economy) during the next major flood event. The presentation uses a case study to help demonstrate how the "6 Steps" have been used to script, sustain and successfully direct a performance of “My Favorite Flood Fight – Starring My Community”.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Identify what step(s) of a sustainable “6 Step” flood fight program their jurisdiction is currently in and what to do next.
    2. Determine what strategic and tactical roles and responsibilities their organization should and can provide to their community
    3. Recognize what flood fight related preparedness activities need to be incorporated into their day-to-day culture


    SPEAKERS:
    • Ron Stirrat
      Chief, Readiness & Contingency Operations Division,  US Army Corps of Engineers,  Wilmington,  NC

    Category:
    • Storm Water / Flood Control
    • Emergency Management

    The City of West Des Moines started using an automated vehicle location system approximately 8 years ago. Our first system was primarily location only data with a few other features also included. Since the start of our program we have evolved into more of a multifaceted system which is used for everything from inventory control to contractor monitoring. The success of our system has had a few speed bumps along the way but we have been able to overcome these obstacles and develop a very beneficial program. Staff is always looking for new ways to use this rapidly growing technology. Overcoming the obstacles of working with vendors can be one of the most difficult problems to deal with. Some equipment will work with on one system and not another and so on…. The key to making relationships work is to make sure there is an open and honest discussion prior to installing a new component that has to work with an existing system. Technology has changed significantly from our first system to where we are today. Come see if our experience can help your agency.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Experiment with new technology to gain more efficiency in your operation
    2. Create an environment where employees understand the benefits of this technology
    3. Explore new technology and not be afraid to take some risks


    SPEAKERS:
    • Kevin Hensley
      Stormwater Supervisor,  City of West Des Moines,  West Des Moines,  IA

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice
    • Fleet Services
    • Management

    Anyone who supervises crews and equipment will eventually be faced with an internal investigation stemming from a vehicle or equipment accident. This presentation will help managers determine how to train their operators to respond quickly and effectively when they are involved in an accident. Policies will be discussed to set appropriate priorities for duties of those involved. Attendees will know what evidence is critical to the accident and how it must be documented and preserved. Case studies will be used to show how the findings and conclusion should be documented and presented to address issues with equipment design, operator training, or policy revision.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Train operators to respond to an accident when they are involved.
    2. Initiate and conduct an investigation for an accident involving equipment.
    3. Present an analysis that is complete and supported by facts.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Greg Brown
      Fleet Engineer,  ODOT,  Salem,  OR

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

4:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Monday, April 8, 2013


7:30 AM - 9:30 AM
    Responding to an emergency or an incident has been something that Public Works has always done. We have worked on floods, tornados, hurricanes, blizzards, landslides, and a multitude of other emergencies or incidents. Today, with Incident Management Systems, Public Works, Police, Fire, Emergency Management and Emergency Medical Departments are charged with protecting this country's people and infrastructure within our communities. Public works: We are first responders, We are public safety We are vital to our communities We are engaged Please join us for this interactive General Session and opening ceremony at 7:30 am Monday Morning.

    Room :  Ballroom

    SPEAKERS:
    • David L. Bergner, PWLF
      Principal,  Monte Vista Associates, LLC,  Mesa,  AZ
    • Tom Martin
      Operations Program Coordinator,  I-95 Corridor Coalition,  Williamsburg,  VA
    • Brian R. Usher, PWLF
      Director of Public Works,  City of Largo,  Largo,  FL
    • Kimberly C. Vasconez, MPA
      MPIA Team Ldr Trf Incid&Events Mgmt,  Federal Highway Administration - DOT,  Washington,  DC
    • Christine Walsh
      DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS,  City of Beloit,  Beloit,  WI

9:00 AM - 3:30 PM
       EXHIBIT HOURS
9:30 AM - 11:10 AM
9:40 AM - 10:25 AM
    Speaker: Kurt Kinion, Business Development Manager, Vaisala, Booths: 420/422/424 Technology exists today that can assist you with just about any weather challenge you experience on your streets. This technology can reduce your costs, provide a safer roadway, and lessen the stress you feel towards weather decisions. Learn how to create a plan to tackle your weather challenges from an expert in road weather.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
10:30 AM - 11:15 PM
    Phil Prucey, Winter Equipment Co. Booth: 259 Winter® Equipment Company has been in the business of saving municipalities, D.O.T.'s, counties, and contractors money and time since the release of our first product, the PlowGuard in 1990. Our patented process of applying chromium carbide matrix to steel and cast steel is the basis for our success in the market. Now the PlowGuard technology has been incorporated into "System” which" is a self- contained product that includes all of the necessary components to complete a blade change on a plow This presentation will lead with "best practices" for a proper blade change. This covers the steps that all individuals should follow in effort to complete a secure installation of a plow blade. We will then discuss the benefits to using products that reduce blade expenditures, blade changes, and improve operational efficiency. Come see how reducing blade change outs can improve your snow removal operation.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    This session will center on new technology that has been developed over the past few years. The focus will be how two agencies have incorporated some of this technology into their operations and what the results have been. Not only will the speakers talk about the successes they have experienced but also some of the challenges. They will talk about the importance of how failure can sometimes also benefit you in the long run!

    Room :  207 CD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Teach others in our profession the importance of taking risk and being allowed to occasionally fail.
    2. Identify what new technology may help your agency achieve its goals.
    3. Generate enthusiasm among all levels of staff to get involved in new ideas.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Kevin Hensley
      Stormwater Supervisor,  City of West Des Moines,  West Des Moines,  IA
    • Bret Hodne, PWLF
      Public Works Director,  City of West Des Moines,  West Des Moines,  IA
    • Douglas E. Legg, retired
      Administrator 1,  City County of Denver,  Denver,  CO

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    This presentation will provide information and techniques to reduce the negative impacts involved in Winter Operations. Information will be presented to show attendees the negative impacts that the various snow and ice control chemicals (including abrasives) have on the environment. Information will be presented showing the negative impacts that certain snow and ice control chemicals have on our infrastructure. Systems, processes and techniques will be discussed to illustrate how we can minimize the negative impacts of snow and ice control chemicals. The presentation will also show how a comprehensive management plan and the use of technology can improve the efficiency of winter operations and result in a reduction in chemical usage for both anti and deicing.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Educate others on the various methods and systems that can be used to reduce the negative environmental impact of winter operations.
    2. Conceptualize how using systems, processes and technology can both improve the efficiency of snow and ice control operations while improving the environmental impact of winter operations.
    3. Educate others on the negative environmental impacts of winter operations.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Richard M. Balgowan, CPM, CPWM, PE
      HIGHWAY MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING EXPERT,  Robson Forensic Inc,  Hamilton,  NJ

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    In this session the speaker will share an operational overview of the snow and ice control program used in the City of Dubuque, Iowa. The presentation will include information on scheduling, type of equipment used, the role of contracted help, and the use of liquids for pre-wetting and anti-icing technology. The presentation will also cover how an AVL system and other new technology that has been incorporated into their current snow and ice control operations.

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Evaluate their agencies operations to another city operation
    2. Acquire operational information concerning snow and ice control operations.
    3. Determine if anti-icing, the use of AVL or other techniques currently implemented in other snow and ice control operations would be right for their program.


    SPEAKERS:
    • John Klostermann
      Street/Sewer Maintenance Supv,  City of Dubuque,  Dubuque,  IA

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    The City of Minneapolis, Department of Public Works began development of a snow plow tracking and performance monitoring program over the winter of 2012-2013 that doesn’t rely on Automatic Vehicle Location technology. Using iPads and GIS Online mapping technology, Public Works initiated a route tracking infrastructure dubbed SnowTrax to provide managers with graphical feedback to monitor field progress, and begin to provide the ability to produce enhanced performance measurement reporting. This presentation will describe the technology applications, describe the problems and successes in trying to implement this initiative, and discuss or demonstrate some of the types of outputs realized in the first season.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Develop a snow and ice control performance tracking program without AVL.
    2. Monitor route progress cost-effectively.
    3. Report snow and ice control information graphically.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Michael D. Kennedy, PE
      Director of Transportation Maintenance and Repair,  City of Minneapolis,  Minneapolis,  MN

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    Weather plays an important role in our emergency response lives, and in fact causes most of our crises situations. Trying to know when weather is about to cause an emergency and what will be the possible impacts, is critical to anyone responsible for operations during an event. The other major challenge is for nearly the entire country the potential for a weather event is not reserved to a certain time of year. Sure snow storms only come in the winter and hurricanes during the summer and fall, but during any month most of us are at risk for a major weather event. What can we do about them? Nothing right! No, proper planning and building your arsenal of decision making tools is critical to improving the impact weather will have on your community. Even though this is the North American Snow Conference this presentation will not only focus on winter emergencies, but also other year round challenges that can be just (if not more) impactful. This session will also specifically focus on winter challenges that are more southerly in nature. It will discuss the different tools to use before, during, and after a weather emergency. We will highlight what is important to look for, and give the participants an understanding the mechanics of these weather events. Attendees will leave with a greater (yet simplistic) view of what steps they can take to greatly improve their decision making during weather emergencies.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Interpret weather information before a weather emergency.
    2. Decide what steps need to be taken to lessen the impact on their community.
    3. Prepare a weather plan to allow their community to become better prepared.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Jon D. Tarleton
      Marketing Manager/Meteorologist,  Vaisala, Inc.,  Saint Louis,  MO

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    Liquid Use and Anti-icing are the latest buzz words in Winter maintenance. Many folks know they should be considering these processes but aren't really sure how to get started. This session will discuss the current trends in liquids - what to use, how to blend and when to use as well as de-mystify the world of anti-icing. Anti-icing isn't something to utilize in every storm - but when the conditions warrant it - it can save money, time and lives.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Recognize when to use liquids and anti-Icing
    2. Communicate the difference between deicing and anti-icing
    3. Determine when liquids are NOT appropriate


    SPEAKERS:
    • R. Mark DeVries
      Application Expert,  Vaisala Inc,  Marengo,  IL
    • Benjamin Dow
      Director of Public Works,  City of Fargo,  Fargo,  ND

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
12:45 PM - 1:45 PM
    Join us for this unique opportunity to chat directly with the experts. These informal roundtable discussions allow you to ask questions specific to your agency. Moderators will lead group discussion around specific topics, and participants are encouraged to share their challenges, solutions, and ideas. 1. Emergency Management in Winter Operations: Moderator: Ms. Christine Walsh, Director of Operations, City of Beloit 2. Public Fleet Manager Certification: Moderator: Mr. John Scharffbillig, Director PW Fleet Services, City of Minneapolis 3. Sustainability and Winter Maintenance: Moderator: Mr. Warren Nicholishen, CRS, Supervisor Operations – Roads, City of Kawartha Lakes 4. Using Social Media for Winter Emergencies: Moderator: Mr. David L. Lawry, PE, Dir. Of Village Operations, Village Of Wauconda, Wauconda, IL 5. Getting Started With Liquids: Moderator: Mr. John Paul Johnson, CET, Operations Manager, Wellington County, Guelph, ON 6. Advanced Technologies in Winter Maintenance Moderator: Mr. Kevin Hensley, Stormwater Supervisor, City of West Des Moines 7. Small Agency – Big Problems Mr. Kürt D. Blomquist, PE, Public Works Director, City of Keene, NH

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
12:50 PM - 1:35 PM
    Speakers: Denver Preston & Dave Tribolet, K-Tech Specialty Coatings, Booth: #344 The lack of performance data has put most agencies in the unenviable position of choosing their deicer based on sketchy testimonials, unsupported sales pitches, or by conducting their own trials, which can be very costly and time consuming. Consequently, most agencies remain in the dark when it comes to the performance of their pre-wetting agent verses other, potentially better performing agents. Why is deicer performance so important? Poor performing deicers are extremely costly to use and a lot of agencies are using them! K-Tech Specialty Coatings is the leading provider of high performance salt pre-wetting agents/deicers in the Great Lakes region of our country. We hold more deicer performance data than any company in the United States. Come learn something new about deicers.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
2:00 PM - 2:50 PM
    With only seven days to prepare for a historic flood, the thought of a blizzard was outrageous, until the snow began to fall. This session will offer you the opportunity to see how the City of Fargo managed two very different events simultaneously. You will receive an overview of outcomes learned by using the National Incident Management System (NIMS), how we utilized other public assets and staff, and how our collective efforts with community volunteers saved the City of Fargo.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Examine how the National Incident Management System worked for Fargo.
    2. Recognize the resources other public agencies have to offer.
    3. Motivate employees and volunteers to succeed.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Benjamin Dow
      Director of Public Works,  City of Fargo,  Fargo,  ND

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

    In the 1970's the Michigan DOT did a study on the bounce and scatter effects of salt applied to roads via snow plows. This research revealed that in a typical field research project - if 100% of salt is spread in the center 1/3 of a dry road, only 46% stays in the center with 12% on each of the outer thirds of the road, and we can lose 15% off each side of the road; which equates to a 30% loss of material off the road. Michigan Dot is now conducting a follow up study on Bounce and Scatter. The objectives of the 2012 study are: Determine how much salt stays on the road Determine the speeds at which we can effectively and efficiently apply salt Determine if there is a difference in salt delivery systems Compare treated salt vs. untreated salt Expand on MDOT research from the 1970’s Come learn what they discovered!

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Determine how much salt stays on the road
    2. Calculate the speeds at which salt can be effectively and efficiently applied.
    3. Compare treated salt vs. untreated salt


    SPEAKERS:
    • Tim Croze, PE
      Region Maintenance Support Engineer,  Michigan Dept of Transportation,  Lansing,  MI
    • Justin Droste, PE
      Roadway Operations Engineer,  Michigan DOT,  Lansing,  MI
    • Rich Hassenzahl
      Maintenance Superintendent,  MDOT,  Kalamazoo,  MI
    • Matt Pratt
      Maintenance Coordinator,  Michigan Dept of Transportation,  Lansing,  MI

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice
    • Streets, Roads and Bridges

    The Pacific Northwest experiences some of the most varied weather in the United States. The weather is generally wet and cool, with frequent short duration icing events; but, can also include heavy lowland and world-record mountain snow events, and the strongest non-tropical storms in the nation. The County has a diverse topography ranging from sea-level to 14, 410ft, three river drainages, and 235 miles of marine shoreline. Consequently, the County can experience numerous microclimates within its boundaries. Learn how Managers developed a cost-effective and environmentally responsible plan that meets the challenges presented by these very diverse and dynamic conditions.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Develop an efficient and effective snow and ice plan that can address a diverse range of weather conditions
    2. Educate your employees, supervisors and managers to consistently execute your plans in order to deliver the outcomes that are expected by your elected officials and your citizens.
    3. Collaborate with elected officials and customers when they know they can rely on your agency to spend their tax dollars effectively to keep roads safe and functional during inclement weather events.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Bruce Wagner
      Road Operations Manager,  Pierce County,  Spanaway,  WA
    • Kendall Wilits
      Supervisor,  Pierce County CMF,  Spanaway,  WA

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    For the past few years, the Kentucky Department of Highways has participated in the MDSS Pooled Fund Study with Meridian Environmental. Through this growing period, Kentucky has experimented with a handful of routes in one area of the Commonwealth that were included in the MDSS forecasting service. The Department is also making an appreciable expansion with the installation of AVL equipment onto Department owned and contracted snow plow trucks The primary reason for development of an AVL program is to be able to get a handle on the material application rates, which have been rather excessive in recent seasons. Come see what they learned.

    Room :  207 CD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Determine the practicality and usefulness of an MDSS-type weather service and AVL program.
    2. Decide if a pavement forecasting service would be beneficial for their organization.
    3. Compose a proposal to develop their own MDSS efforts.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Michael Williams
      Snow & Ice Program Coordinator,  Kentucky Department of Highways,  Frankfort,  KY

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

        'IT JUST KEPT COMING'
    In November of 2011 it started snowing in Cordova, Alaska. For five months, it snowed almost continuously. Additionally, the temperatures didn’t warm intermittently as is usually the case in our maritime climate. As a result, instead of the customary 80” of snowfall with periodic melting, the community received more than 27 feet having almost 100% accumulation without interruption. The City, State and contracted crews that gathered en force to handle the situation did so with noteworthy stamina, ingenuity and resolve. Many lessons were presented for learning in the process but they had little to do with how to handle over 300” of snow; that happens every season in many locations across America. The real learning curve involved how to maintain the upper hand in a season of unexpectedly high snowfall and to do so without the aid of nature to limit the accumulation. This presentation will hopefully enable the listener to appraise the readiness of the resources he or she is responsible for and run mock scenarios that can indicate strengths and weaknesses within the system. Three areas of focus include 1) Preparation, 2) Real-time adaptability and 3) Documentation of the event. While there are other topics that could be considered these three stood out in the case of Cordova as having the greatest impact on operations.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Prepare a list of essential resources necessary to carry out operations under normal conditions then examine that list for potential soft spots.
    2. Adapt quickly to the unexpected.
    3. Document all pertinent information


    SPEAKERS:
    • Moe Zamarron
      Director of Public Works,  City of Cordova,  Cordova,  AK

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    This panel session is comprised of the winners of this year’s APWA Excellence in Snow & Ice Control Award. APWA’s Awards Program recognizes individuals, groups and chapters for their outstanding contributions to the profession of public works. Established to promote excellence in the management and administration of public works snow and ice operations, the Excellence in Snow and Ice Control award also promotes the best practices in snow and ice removal, while minimizing environmental impacts. This year, the three recipients for this year’s APWA Excellence in Snow and Ice Control Award are: The Ohio Department of Transportation; The City of Green Bay, WI. Department of Public Works and The City of Novi, MI. Department of Public Services. Only a few agencies have implemented processes that warrant receiving the Excellence In Snow & Ice Control Award each year. Come learn how this year's winners transitioned to excellence.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Compare their agency's practices with the winner's agency.
    2. Identify what steps their agency would need to take to submit for the award
    3. Determine process changes that could improve their agency


    SPEAKERS:
    • Thomas M. Lyden, PE
      Administrator, Office of Maintenance,  Ohio Department of Transportation,  Columbus,  OH
    • Matt Wiktorowski
      Field Ops Mgr for Public Services,  City of Novi,  Novi,  MI

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
    Speaker: Lenora Meister, President & CEO, Salt-Away Products, Inc. Booth: 231 This presentation discusses the properties of Sodium Chloride and how it interacts with water and surfaces. To show how an additive to water can assist in eliminating the resistance of water in the effort to move salt off of surfaces, tests of 4 different additives were performed on salt contaminated metal surfaces and results were compared to using only water on the same surfaces, This technology uniquely addresses controlling corrosion caused by salt.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
2:50 PM - 3:30 PM
3:15 PM - 3:15 PM
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
    During the middle of a snow emergency is the wrong time to figure out who makes the call to close a road. With advance planning, coordination and use of incident command principles road closure decisions and implementation can be integrated into your snow emergency plan. This session will look at challenges faced in severe winter storms when no advance plans have been made, give examples of effective plans and discuss lessons that can be learned from non-snow weather incidents and emergency responses.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Recognize problems that result if you fail to plan for winter emergency road closures
    2. Develop winter maintenance plans that include provisions for winter emergency road closures
    3. Adapt emergency planning concepts from emergency responses unrelated to winter weather.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Benjamin J. Jordan, PE, PWLF
      WI LTAP Program Director,  University of Wisconsin-Madison EPD,  Madison,  WI

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

        GET A CLUE WHY IT'S BLUE
    With regulations regarding CAFÉ standards and a 90% reduction in emissions by 2015, agencies working to reduce NOx emissions in existing vehicles are turning to Diesel Emissions Fluid (DEF) – a UREA-based liquid which is packaged in bottles with blue caps. This session will discuss the best ways to handle UREA/DEF and how it impacts fleets, vehicles and the community.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Determine the costs and benefits of using DEF in your agency.
    2. Explain to council members and the community how use of DEF meets emission standards.
    3. Plan procedures for storage and use in order to eliminate inappropriate use of DEF.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Craig Aeschbacher
      Fleet Manager Southeast Market,  Ford Motor Company,  Milton,  GA
    • Thomas C. Collins, PWLF
      Deputy Director,  Town of Natick,  Natick,  MA
    • Dennis R. Hogan, CAFM, CPFP
      Director of Internal Maintenance,  CRST Lincoln Sales Inc,  Cedar Rapids,  IA

    Category:
    • Fleet Services

        LET'S TALK WINTER
    Managing winter operations is a significant challenge. Not only are there storms to deal with, managers are faced with the challenges of how to incorporate new technology, secure funding, maintain service levels, deal with an aging workforce, increase recruitment and retention and provide effective training. This panel of featured conference speakers will discuss the present and future challenges of winter operations.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Compare other agencies policies and procedures to their own
    2. Determine if technology enhancements, methods improvement, or equipment upgrades are needed in their agency
    3. Identify training needs and potential training resources


    SPEAKERS:
    • Bret Hodne, PWLF
      Public Works Director,  City of West Des Moines,  West Des Moines,  IA
    • Ken Martin
      Deputy Streets Superintendent,  Charlotte Dept of Transportation,  Charlotte,  NC
    • Jerry Pickett
      Streets Superintendent,  City of Greeley,  Greeley,  CO

    Category:
    • Management

    In 2010 South Finland got two snowy winters to battle with. Total snowfall was more than 180 centimeters and more than 150 days with snow cover in each winter. The heavy snowfall caused considerable problems to the functioning of society and, in particular, to rescue work and public transport. The Helsinki Public Works Department had prepared a contingency plan for the management of exceptionally hard winters. But, in fact, three hard winters requiring management of the extremely exceptional situations, required a more extensive and detailed work plan. In the contingency plan the development of snow depth is being followed by the system which has been built together with the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The managing group for snow logistics will get the information daily and by following the snow depth development the group is able to make smart decisions to change the maintenance system. The contingency plan includes demands for change in the clearing of snow, faster removal of vehicles parked on the street side and temporary parking prohibitions in the winter time, new snow reception sites and, in particular, detailed and intensive communication to the residents and the media. The session will discuss the experiences of the city from the past winter, when the plan was taken into action.

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Analyze and prepare better for hard winters.
    2. Convince the residents, politicians and themselves that all the preparations possible have made.
    3. Identify the top five aspects which need to be taken into consideration in winter maintenance.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Ville Alatyppo, MSc, D SC, Cand
      FAME Sec Gen-City Dir of Maint Unit,  City of Helsinki,  Helsinki,

    Category:
    • Management

    This session will examine the principles of sustainability, and how they can be applied to all aspects of winter maintenance. The approach taken toward sustainability begins with a clear definition of level of service. Once an agency has determined which level of service should be applied to which road segments, then the agency personnel can work to achieve those levels with the most efficient and effective tools available, all the while balancing the competing needs of cost, safety, mobility, and the environment. Six areas of winter maintenance will be examined in depth to see how sustainable winter maintenance can be measured and achieved: levels of service, in-storm activities, materials usage, equipment selection and operation, annual operations, and performance measurement.

    Room :  207 CD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Define what sustainability is and how it applies in the field of winter maintenance
    2. Evaluate their agency's winter maintenance activities for sustainability
    3. Determine what changes they can make to improve the sustainability of their agency’s winter maintenance activities


    SPEAKERS:
    • Dr. Wilfrid A. Nixon, PE, PhD, PWLF
      Professor,  University of Iowa,  Iowa City,  IA
    • Marc F. Valenti
      Highway Superintendent,  Town of Lexington,  Lexington,  MA
    • Eric Willett
        Maine DOT,  Bangor,  ME

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    This session brings together experts in winter maintenance, project planning, and project construction to share their experiences and ideas that can help planners develop projects that fit the needs of the transportation community without sacrificing winter maintenance. With operations taking part in the discussion and review of the planning and design, items such as snow storage, turning lanes, sight line obstructions, drainage, traffic calming devices and pedestrian needs may be identified, evaluated and modified to fit the long term maintenance programs of your operations best practices.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Collaborate with transportation engineers on winter maintenance considerations.
    2. Recognize the needs of other internal branches within your agency when it comes to road and asset building infrastructure.
    3. Discern the operational and economic consequences of not being pro-active instead of reactive.


    SPEAKERS:
    • R. Mark DeVries
      Application Expert,  Vaisala Inc,  Marengo,  IL
    • William P. Kennedy, PE
      Engr Sup- Denver Street Maintenance,  City & County of Denver CO,  Denver,  CO
    • Kevin McCarthy
      DPW Superintendent,  City of Farmington Hills,  Farmington Hills,  MI
    • Warren Nicholishen, CRS CIG
      Supt of Roads And Traffic Operations,  Town of Richmond Hill-Community Svc, PW,  Richmond Hill,  ON

    Category:
    • Engineering and Technology


Tuesday, April 9, 2013


8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
    Within this session participants will learn the procedures and criteria FEMA uses to make its recommendations to the President after State Governor requests a declaration following a snowstorm or severe winter storm. Find out what FEMA will cover as eligible work for snow events and what constitutes a near-record snowfall. Learn the history and current changes within the assistance policy.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Anticipate the likelihood of a winter storm declaration.
    2. Make informed budgeting decisions about the “real” costs of fighting a winter storm.
    3. Plan your agency's response to a near-record snowfall.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Christine Walsh
      DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS,  City of Beloit,  Beloit,  WI

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

        HOW DO YOU FIGHT ICE?
    Snow plows are handy for removing snow - but what do you do when everything is covered in ice? This panel discussion will talk through the various practices and products used to cope with an ice storm. Attendees will gain an understanding of ice control methods such as pre-treatment, anti-icing and deicing as well as treatment recommendations.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Explain pro-active measures used in ice control operations
    2. Discuss the benefits of proper procedures and applications in ice control
    3. Define the appropriate technique needed prior, during and following an event


    SPEAKERS:
    • Bret Hodne, PWLF
      Public Works Director,  City of West Des Moines,  West Des Moines,  IA
    • Ken Martin
      Deputy Streets Superintendent,  Charlotte Dept of Transportation,  Charlotte,  NC

    This session will focus on urban challenges facing larger cities with an overview of how the City of London, Ontario handles winter maintenance. It will discuss London’s unique weather challenges, the citizens expectations, how the underfunded budget is spent wisely, the managing of staff and resources as well as how we are constantly improving our level of service. There will be an opportunity for participants to ask questions and provide comments on how their organizations deal with these topics. The presentation will tell how the City of London deals with winter and give those in attendance a different perspective from which to compare their winter operations.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Compare how London Ontario provides snow and ice control with other agencies.
    2. Appreciate the challenge of dealing with lake affect snow
    3. Differentiate how their sanding operation works and compare to their agency


    SPEAKERS:
    • Terry Masse
      Manager of Operations - Transportation,  City of London,  London,  ON
    • Don Purchase
      MANAGER OPERATIONS,  City of London,  London,  ON

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    In 2005 the City of Ithaca, NY in partnership with the Cornell University Urban Horticulture Institute built a small, experimental parking lot adjacent to a flood control channel. The four key components of the parking lot are: 1. A deep base of CU Structural Soil with the capacity to hold a 100 year rain event 2. Porous asphalt and impervious asphalt used side by side 3. Disease resistant hybrid elms 4. Tree protection capable of withstanding snow removal operations This presentation will examine how the parking lot is performing even years later and the ramifications of up-scaling such a project. Discussion will include what insights have been uncovered such as a surprising maintenance discovery that the porous asphalt had less ice sheeting due to infiltration during freeze/thaw cycles.

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Eliminate stormwater discharge from parking lots while designing for tree canopy to reduce the urban heat island effect.
    2. Encourage new practices for stormwater management in parking lots.
    3. Engineer parking lots for tree survival, water storage, and reduced maintenance.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Andrew Hillman, RS
      Business Developer,  DRG,  Trumansburg,  NY

    Category:
    • Environment/Sustainability
    • Storm Water / Flood Control
    • Snow and Ice

    Dispatch, routing, material usage, liability, and visibility of fleet assets are all challenges the City of Mississauga faced in managing winter operations vehicles. These challenges have been solved with the deployment of a GPS/AVL solution. In the case of the City of Mississauga, the chosen solution for implementation was InterFleet by Webtech Wireless. The City of Mississauga uses a mix of city and contractor vehicles for winter maintenance. The system has allowed the city to have greater accountability of its contractors. Operational managers now know what their vehicles are doing and can dispatch and route effectively and efficiently. At the same time, liability has been reduced by proving exactly what, when, and where vehicles were operating.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Evaluate a GPS/AVL solution to determine how it can improve your fleet operations and reduce your liability risk.
    2. Manage contractors and keep them accountable for route coverage, materials usage, and responsiveness in winter fleet operations.
    3. Anticipate and avoid common pitfalls in choosing and deploying and implementing a GPS/AVL solution.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Bob Levesque
      MANAGER, WORKS MAINT. & OPS,  City of Mississauga,  Mississauga,  ON

    Category:
    • Engineering and Technology

    In the arena of Public Works, a love-hate relationship often exists about street trees. You may love trees….if they don’t cause you problems or drive complaints. But if they lift or crack the sidewalk, limit visibility, increase your workload, or keep dying on you, you might hate them. However, whether you love trees or hate them, street trees are valuable public assets and a necessity of a healthy city. Being a public asset, like vehicles, trees must be planned for, managed and maintained to perform their best. During this presentation participants will learn about important urban forest population dynamics, including species diversity and size class distribution that affect the outcomes of tree management decisions and ultimately make public trees healthier and more resistant to unexpected weather events. Case studies will be utilized to facilitate the discussion.

    Room :  207 CD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Communicate the benefits of proper tree care with other professionals to improve public safety and possibly reduce future losses.
    2. Implement a systematic approach to tree management to improve the overall health of the urban forest and reduce future problems with trees.
    3. Assess street trees to improve management strategies.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Steve Ketner
      Tree Management Supervisor,  City of Charlotte,  Charlotte,  NC
    • Shirley Vaughn
      Project Developer,  The Davey Tree Expert Company,  Kent,  OH

    Category:
    • Parks and Grounds

8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
       EXHIBIT HOURS
9:00 AM - 9:45 AM
    Speaker: Alain Sergile, Director of Product Management, NexTraq, Booth: 122 Learn how the marriage of cloud-based software solutions and mobile applications are allowing business and government fleets to provide superior service while reducing operational costs through vehicle and worker efficiencies.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
9:50 AM - 10:35 AM
    Speaker: Bradley Carlson, Continental Research Corporation Booth: 330 Unchecked rust is the equivalent to metal as cancer is to human tissue. Rust is an insidious problem that is under recognized as preventable and treatable. The cost of corrosion is estimated to be over $137,000,000 annually; 14% to Government, 16% to infrastructure, 21% to Transportation, and the remainder to Manufacturing & Utilities. These figures do not include the cost of manpower, downtime nor customer satisfaction, which are all critical success factors for public service providers. Continental will demonstrate best practices in prevention of rust, ongoing preventative maintenance, and remediation of problems that exist with rolling stock, snow removal equipment, and metal components. Continental Research provides rust inhibition and remediation systems for extending the life of plows, vehicles, truck beds, salt spreaders, and general equipment used in snow removal.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
    Blizzards and hurricanes are disturbing natural phenomena. Both cause a great deal of damage but under different conditions. Blizzards involve heavy snowfall whereas hurricanes involve heavy torrential rains with great winds. Anyone that has encountered such experiences has prayed to never see them again. Blizzards can wreak havoc on a community and hurricanes are known to have caused an amazing amount of property damage. Both blizzards and hurricanes can also have an adverse impact on human lives. The national weather service has done a great job in preparing the public for hurricanes. Most individuals understand the potential severity of the storm and heed the calls for advance planning - including getting groceries, stocking up on medicine and taking steps to ensure they are close to critical locations. For some reason, the public often does not recognize the inherent dangers of winter storms and blizzards. This session will compare and contrast how these storms are handled by local agencies, the press and the public and what you can do to prepare your community.

    Room :  207 CD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Compare and contrast how these storms are handled differently by local agencies.
    2. Incorporate evacuation and preparation processes typical for hurricanes into blizzard preparation.
    3. Communicate blizzard risks more accurately to the driving public.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Gregg Benedict
      Senior Transportation Meteorologist,  Telvent DTN, LLC/Schneider Electric,  Burnsville,  MN
    • R. Mark DeVries
      Application Expert,  Vaisala Inc,  Marengo,  IL
    • Shawn Truelson
      Transportation Industry Manager,  Telvent DTN, LLC/Schneider Electric,  Burnsville,  MN

        CLEAR ROADS INITIATIVES
    Clear Roads will provide an overview of Clear Roads activities and resources: The presentation will include a brief overview of completed, current and future as well as an overview of Partnership projects including: The Aurora Knowledge base The Winter Maintenance Peer Exchange Computer-Based Training (CBT) Pacific Northwest Snowfighters (PNS) AASHTO TIG Focus Technologies: Tow Plow Additionally participants will take a tour the Clear Roads Website and Resources including: Winter Safety Campaign Resources Product Experience Feedback E-Newsletters Synthesis Reports

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Explain the impact of implementing completed research
    2. Identify new technology and research that could affect their agency
    3. Access tools and information provided by Clear Roads and its partners


    SPEAKERS:
    • Tim Chojnacki
       Missouri DOT,  Jefferson City,  MO
    • John Scharffbillig
      Director PW Fleet Services,  City of Minneapolis,  Minneapolis,  MN
    • Allen K. Williams
      Asst District Engineer,  Virginia DOT,  Salem,  VA

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    Disasters generate huge amounts of debris that Public Works agencies must handle. Debris management is no longer a matter of “burn or bury”; complex environmental regulations must be followed. Natural events such as floods, windstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, blizzards and ice storms create huge amounts of debris over large areas. Technological incidents (such as the I-35 bridge collapse in Minneapolis or the San Bruno, pipeline explosion) generate some debris which may have to be preserved for investigate purposes. Likewise, debris from terrorist events such as the 9/11 attacks and the Oklahoma City federal office building bombing require special handling for later criminal prosecutions. Every Public Works agencies should have a general Emergency Operations Plan and Debris Management is an important component of that. This should span all phases of emergency management: planning, preparation, response, recovery and mitigation. Typically, many agencies either do not have such a plan or haven’t updated it for some time. The focus of this presentation is to describe the role and responsibilities of Public Works agencies in all-hazards emergencies, the need for a comprehensive debris management program, how it fits into any jurisdiction’s emergency management structure, and the key components of a debris management plan.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Recognize the role and responsibility of Public Works in emergency management.
    2. Prepare or update a comprehensive Debris Management plan.
    3. Execute the Debris Management plan in a timely and thorough manner when disasters strike.


    SPEAKERS:
    • David L. Bergner, PWLF
      Principal,  Monte Vista Associates, LLC,  Mesa,  AZ

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

    This session will describe how the science of deicing applies to real world issues such as application rates (melting capacity), application timing (melting speed) and the influence of pavement temperature (re-freeze). With improved understanding of the underlying science, snow fighters will be better positioned to successfully adjust techniques and strategies to ever-changing weather patterns and public expectations.

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Explain phase diagrams and what they reveal about melt performance.
    2. Explain the cause of re-freeze and what can be done to prevent it.
    3. Establish an understanding of the chemistry behind deicers.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Joseph B. Althouse
      Technical Representative,  Occidental Chemical Corporation,  Ludington,  MI

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    “Snow Bosses” know how winter storms affect their operations, but they often have to justify why overtime was required or why more costly materials were used to keep the roadways safe during particular storms. This presentation will help you create a “FREE SOURCE” list to easily obtain in-depth weather data that goes far beyond snow or ice amounts. Participants will learn how to put together a comprehensive report that will help authorities understand why over-time and extra materials are sometimes required. Relating start time, end time, precipitation type, and number of “waves” of precipitation can be matched with an operations log to completely justify budgetary expenditures.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Produce a comprehensive, data driven and graphical report from free weather sources.
    2. Educate your fiduciary authorities on how the winter weather events affected your budget throughout the season.
    3. Present a clear operational analysis of the different costs (labor & materials) associated with each type of winter weather event.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Sara Croke
      PRESIDENT,  Weather or Not, Inc.,  Shawnee,  KS

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    This presentation will help municipalities assess and adjudicate their needs when that decision to contract winter operations is made. It will aid in defining the perspective fleet type, configuration, duration of the contract and add-on equipment options. The session will focus on how to recognize budget concerns and prepare ahead of time, to understand that it is not just about specifying a general winter contract, but knowing the Urban Versus Rural expectations are very different. The ability to track labor, material, costs, fuel, and fleet rationalization will enhance meeting your agencies Levels of Service and your Standard Operating Procedures. The contracting or outsourcing of winter maintenance equipment provides you opportunity to enhance the operation, thus improving the quality of equipment or raising your levels of service.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Assess your existing and future winter maintenance needs.
    2. Develop a specification of a winter maintenance contract.
    3. Devise contingency plans so that the road surface during an event is not compromised.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Warren Nicholishen, CRS CIG
      Supt of Roads And Traffic Operations,  Town of Richmond Hill-Community Svc, PW,  Richmond Hill,  ON

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

10:40 AM - 11:25 AM
    Speaker: Randy Fowler, Group Sales Director/Snow & Ice, Muncie Power Products, Booths: 547/549 The integration of real-time support technology within central hydraulic systems for snow and ice removal vehicles.

    Room :  Exhibit Floor
11:30 AM - 12:15 PM
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    In January 2011, Atlanta was hit with the most snow in almost 10 years followed by below freezing temperatures for four consecutive days. Bringing forth visions foreign to the city known by some as HOTLANTA! Atlanta and other cities in the south were shut down by this unprecedented combination of weather events. With only 2 plows, 2 motor graders and 8 spreaders the City of Atlanta was immobilized for almost 5 days. Emergency response activities, business and commerce, and the quality of life of everyone in and around the city were impacted by shutdown. Even the Georgia Department of Transportation could not keep the interstates open. In office for exactly one year, the Mayor and the city identified winter response as a priority by increasing its snow removal operation and by developing a plan that reflects collaboration of multiple city departments, local governments and the Georgia department of Transportation, as well as an on-call contract to enlist private sector assistance if needed. This session will give information on the importance of maintaining an updated emergency response plan, recount the Lessons Learned from the 2011 winter weather events and discuss the corrective actions taken to ensure adequate preparation for winter weather events.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Recognize the importance of maintaining an updated emergency response plan
    2. Compare Atlanta's response to their own agency
    3. Discuss the corrective actions taken to ensure adequate preparation for winter weather events.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Rachel Sanders Brown, CET
      District Engineer,  Georgia Department of Transportation,  Chamblee,  GA
    • Teresa C. Smith, PE, PWLF
      Principal,  A & S Engineering,  Evans,  GA

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

    Public Works Officers are often asked to be part of the Emergency Management planning process as they are likely to be involved in the front line in the event of a disaster. They play a key role during and after the intervention.. In this presentation, we will explore how Anthropology can help decision makers to elaborate more culturally sensitive plans. Disaster Anthropology tries to understand the means used by a population to cope and adapt their perceptions of vulnerability and risk in these times of global climate change. In doing so, researchers in this field study the local and traditional knowledge and the perception of risk in the population’s everyday life. Disaster Anthropology brings answers regarding cultural issues to practitioners and decision makers in disaster preparedness. It studies the social transformations and the cultural changes and in the post-disaster period. This knowledge is useful when planning long-term reconstruction. In this presentation, we will discuss a case study: Blanc-Sablon, Quebec, Canada. It is a remote and isolated community who is regularly struggling with severe winter events such as 5 to 6 daylong whiteouts with sustained hurricane forces winds. We will talk about their local knowledge and experiences and see how it can be applied in Public Works while planning for disaster.

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Explore the experience of a highly resilient community that deals with extreme winter events.
    2. Determine that risk perception and emergency preparedness are influenced by life experience and culture.
    3. Explain how disaster changes and transforms societies and crests local knowledge.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Valerie Cere, M.A.
      Disaster Anthropologist, RN,  Canadian Risk and Hazards Network,  Ottawa,  ON

    Category:
    • Emergency Management

    In order to successfully move up the company ladder early preparation is key. Fleet managers must have a passion for their work in order to give 100% effort 24hours a day, 7 days a week, continually learning and working towards an improved end product. This session will focus on reliable methods for Fleet managers including having open door policies, being visible on the shop floor, and meeting with staff regularly. Fleet Managers can by example in getting involved in associations, continuing education training, and setting a professional image. Shop morale is fostered through achievement awards and recognition, letters of appreciation, and staff luncheons. Individual development is also important. Knowledge is critical for the interview process; individuals must attend supervisory seminars, become familiar with department budgets, keep current on certifications, and be involved in council/commission meetings. The commitment of Fleet Managers to their community, staff and customers is unwavering. The best way to be respected as a Fleet Manager is to be trustworthy, loyal and truthful. Your word is who you are!

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Prepare themselves to become a Fleet Manager.
    2. Improve their understanding of the skills and knowledge that's necessary to successfully manage a fleet.
    3. Demonstrate the importance of preparation and communication with City officials, council and users.


    SPEAKERS:
    • Samuel P. Lamerato, CPFP
      Superintendent-Fleet Maintenance,  City of Troy MI,  Troy,  MI

    Category:
    • Fleet Services

    Along with snow, ice and frost, potholes are another product of winter in much of the US and Canada. Snow removal and ice control are considered the main thrust of winter operations in the colder climes but pothole repair should also be included. Arguably the source of most complaints to a public works agencies, at least during winter and early spring, potholes are not only aggravating to drivers but contribute to accidents and cause millions of dollars annually in auto repairs. Potholes can also be hazards to pedestrians crossing streets, resulting in many claims for injuries. Furthermore, if not promptly and properly patched, then the potholes lead to more extensive damage to pavement and resultant higher repair costs later . This presentation will discuss the how and why of pothole formation, review current methods and techniques for repairs, summarize how good pavement design and construction can prevent potholes, and briefly describe the various pavement maintenance processes that also reduce the outbreak of potholes.

    Room :  207 CD

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Acquire better understanding of how potholes form and what can be done to prevent them.
    2. Evaluate the different methods and materials used to repair potholes.
    3. Develop a comprehensive proactive approach to mitigate pothole formation.


    SPEAKERS:
    • David L. Bergner, PWLF
      Principal,  Monte Vista Associates, LLC,  Mesa,  AZ
    • Michael C. Hale, PE
      Retired,  City of Overland Park,  Overland Park,  KS

    Category:
    • Streets, Roads and Bridges

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    In 2010, the ClearRoads pooled fund research program released the results of a study titled "Identifying the Parameters for Effective Implementation of Liquid-Only Plow Routes". The findings appear very promising and include some general use guidelines for liquid-only implementation and recommendations for continued experimentation. Many questions still remain unanswered. The most important being how the treatment decision matrix can be refined to enable public works agencies to successfully utilize direct liquid application (DLA) as a winter maintenance technique. During the upcoming winter of 2012/13, a multi-agency collaboration of winter maintenance agencies in Southeast Michigan (Wixom, Novi, Farmington Hills), along with Sustainable Salting Solutions, will design and test protocols and procedures to evaluate the interrelationships between DLA and; weather forecasts, actual precipitation and other weather parameters, pavement temperatures, liquid materials, application rates and methods, time required to attain desired levels of service, and potential total cost savings. The outcome of this effort will clarify what percentage of annual winter maintenance events can be effectively handled with direct liquid applications. This presentation will provide an overview of the evaluation methods—successful or unsuccessful, make recommendations for continued refinement of the procedures and allow each participating agency to relate their implementation experience.

    Room :  208 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Clarify what parameters are essential to successfully implement DLA into winter operations.
    2. Determine when DLA is effective
    3. Communicate issues and challenges in using DLA with agency staff


    SPEAKERS:
    • Mark Clancey
      Fleet Maintenance Supervisor,  City of Wixom,  Wixom,  MI
    • Mark Cornwell
      Principal,  Sustainable Salting Solutions, LLC,  Holly,  MI
    • Bryan Pickworth
      Road Maintenance Supervisor,  City of Farmington Hills,  Farmington Hills,  MI
    • Matt Wiktorowski
      Field Ops Mgr for Public Services,  City of Novi,  Novi,  MI

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice
    • Management

    The practice of blending deicing chemicals is a hot topic whenever, or wherever, snow and ice personnel gather together. Chemical blending has evolved from the needs of agencies to obtain better performance from their liquid deicing products. All deicing chemicals have distinct properties and freeze points. Blending chemicals can result in a mixture with the best attributes of each product. It can also result in a catastrophe when done incorrectly. The key is learning chemical properties and how they perform then to choose chemicals that are compatible and blend them precisely. Learn from the pioneers in blending the practices and procedures for mixing liquids correctly.

    Room :  208 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Utilize information on how to use winter liquids appropriately
    2. Recognize the different methods for using liquids including when and when not to use them
    3. Build on their current winter operations by successfully adding blends and liquids.


    SPEAKERS:
    • R. Mark DeVries
      Application Expert,  Vaisala Inc,  Marengo,  IL
    • Benjamin Dow
      Director of Public Works,  City of Fargo,  Fargo,  ND
    • Bret Hodne, PWLF
      Public Works Director,  City of West Des Moines,  West Des Moines,  IA

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
        IS YOUR FLEET READY?
    Winter weather and the chemicals used to combat it can take a toll on your fleet. Seasonal maintenance checks not only guarantee the vehicle will hold up during winter months, but also prevent a worker from getting stranded in the cold or risking injury driving an unprepared vehicle. This session will discuss how to ready your fleet for whatever winter throws you.

    Room :  203 A

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Appreciate the value of vehicle maintenance
    2. Develop best practices for their winter fleet
    3. Diagnose common fleet issues in winter


    SPEAKERS:
    • John Scharffbillig
      Director PW Fleet Services,  City of Minneapolis,  Minneapolis,  MN

    Cities with frequent freeze thaw cycles in the winter will all experience it; ice accumulation along the gutters that can grow to the size of small glaciers. With low sun angles in the winter, streets are subjected to extended periods where little sunshine is available to warm pavement. Pavement temperatures in these areas will be 5°F to 10°F cooler than exposed areas, even on cloudy days. Snowfall will be compacted, trickle flows from the street crown or adjacent property will enter the area and refreeze. In as little as a few days, significant ice accumulation will compromise public safety and become a maintenance problem for snow response crews. The common response from citizens is there is a drainage problem and they want an inlet to correct this problem. In Denver we have studied this problem and determined drainage patterns and lack of storm sewers has very little impact on the formation gutter ice. There are design considerations and operational responses that can help mitigate the problem and improve public safety. This session will examine those things that can help in minimizing and mitigating ice development and educate the public on the causes and solutions

    Room :  207 AB

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Determine the cause of ice development of along streets.
    2. Educate the public on the causes for ice development and provide them with simple steps they can take to help mitigate and combat the development of on-street gutter ice.
    3. Develop design guidelines to help minimize the accumulation of ice which will improve public safety and mobility in the winter.


    SPEAKERS:
    • William P. Kennedy, PE
      Engr Sup- Denver Street Maintenance,  City & County of Denver CO,  Denver,  CO

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice

    A common theme at the North Texas Tollway Authority is that since we are a toll agency, we charge for something our competition right next to us gives away. Therefore, when it comes to inclement weather, we must make sure the roadways are a beneficial use for our customers. As a result, the NTTA has developed a Snow and Ice Plan using the Incident Command System to respond to weather events on over 800 lane miles of high speed roadways spread throughout four counties around the Dallas-Fort Worth region. The use of the Incident Command System allows for clear roles and responsibility to communicate effectively throughout an event regardless of the size. The Plan includes items such as the use of computers to map routes and track trucks, the use of multi colored signs at each stockpile, as well as, just pen and paper to update field conditions to the communications liaisons. This presentation will cover how an agency can set up a scalable Snow and Ice Plan using the Incident Management System to provide clear roles and responsibilities for all involved. In addition, it will cover some key items an agency should look so they can set up a comprehensive Snow and Ice Plan.

    Room :  203 B

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Recognize how the Incident Management System can be used to set up a Snow and Ice plan
    2. Establish and deploy a Snow and Ice Plan that includes provisions for how to respond with the appropriate amount of resources
    3. Develop processes to track materials, equipment, and personnel


    SPEAKERS:
    • Eric J. Hemphill, PE
      Director of SIM,  North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA),  Plano,  TX

    Category:
    • Snow and Ice
    • Emergency Management

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
    Jeff's career in NASCAR began in 1974 working as a tire changer for Walter Ballard. Becoming one of the best jackmen in the business, Hammond served on all three of driver Cale Yarborough's Winston Cup championship seasons. Legendary driver Darrell Waltrip took over for Yarborough in 1981 and the Junior Johnson-owned team won yet another championship. At the encouragement of Waltrip, Johnson promoted Jeff to the crew chief position for the start of the 1982 season. And as the old saying goes, "The Rest Is History". The combination of owner Johnson, driver Waltrip and crew chief Hammond set the sport of NASCAR on its ear. Two more championships followed and 43 wins as a crew chief placed Hammond in the record books as one of NASCAR's all time great crew chiefs. Jeff Hammond joined Fox Sports at the end of the 2000 Winston Cup season. He and partner Chris Myers host the weekly pre-race show from the famed "Hollywood Hotel" usually located near Victory Lane at each race track. Jeff contributes to the race coverage on Fox and FX with booth announcers, Mike Joy, Larry McReynolds and Darrell Waltrip. Jeff can also be seen every Friday night at 7pm eastern on Trackside Live on the SPEED Channel. He and show host Steve Byrnes bring you all the happenings on and off the track.

    Room :  Ballroom
6:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    The NASCAR Hall of Fame was built to honor the sport's history, its moments and its best drivers while also functioning as a tribute to passionate fans. You're in for a full-throttle experience during this final evening of the 2013 Snow Conference. Enjoy food and drink while you discover three floors of NASCAR history and amazing artifacts. Get your adrenaline racing as you challenge your friends at more than 50 interactive experiences that will be available like the tire-changing stations, realistic racing simulators and broadcast booth. You'll also have a chance to check out the Hall of Fame inductees, explore their backgrounds and even cast your vote for the next class. Whether you're a history buff, a die-hard NASCAR fan or just looking to share the experience with your peers, you're sure to be in for a night of pedal-to-the-metal fun!

Wednesday, April 10, 2013


8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    The Charlotte Department of Transportation Northwest Operations Yard and Administrative Facility is a state-of-the-art facility, built in 2006. This tour of the facility will highlight the division's snow fighting equipment, 5,000-ton salt storage building and it's highly-effective salt brine manufacturing system with 10,000 gallons salt brine and 5,000 gallon calcium chloride storage capacity. Technicians from the City of Charlotte's Fleet Management Division will also be on hand to demonstrate the tools and equipment used to fight snow and ice on more than 5,200 lane miles of City roadway and maintain the over 6,200+ pieces of rolling and non-rolling stock used throughout the City and County. We had originally planned for this tour to also include a hands-on supplement to the Education Session "Biodiesel in Winter-What You Need To Know". However, this speaker had to cancel. Category:

    This tour takes you to Freightliner Trucks' Mount Holly Plant. Thanks to their more than 630,000 square feet of floor space and approximately 1,550 employees, the Mount Holly facility was recently able to celebrate the production of its 500,000th vehicle – a Freightliner Business Class M2. Open in 1979, the Mount Holly Plant originally produced long-haul heavy-duty Freightliner trucks for customers in the eastern United States and Canada. Discover the major renovation and expansion that took place in 2002 that readied the plant for M2 production and allowed them to hit this historical milestone.
    Located in Cornelius, NC, the Michael Waltrip Racing Shop encompasses over 11 acres and more than 140,000 square feet of NASCAR excitement. Opened in 2007, the complex houses Michael Waltrip Racing's three SPRINT Cup Series race teams: Clint Bowyer (#15 5 Hour Energy Toyota Camry), Mark Martin (#55 Aaron's Toyota Camry) and Martin Truex Jr. (#56 NAPA Toyota Camry). During this tour, you'll observe the inner workings of production such as the machine shop, shocks, suspension, gears & transmission, paint booth, fabrication and final assembly departments as technicians build the cars you see every weekend on TV. In addition, you'll see short films throughout the tour that further detail the immense amount of work it takes to get these machines on the race track. Weather and schedule permitting, you can even watch a LIVE Pit Practice session. Following the tour, you'll be able to visit the Team Store for a memento from your favorite driver and this one-of-a-kind tour