Sep 1, 2015

In the Know




 

 

In the Know: Identifying tips and practices for a more sustainable future

 

Boston boosts composting and recycling
 

Boston, MA – Mayor Martin J. Walsh's Office of Neighborhood Services, Environment, Energy & Open Space, and the City of Boston Public Works Department joined community partners in building an Aerated Static Pile Facility, from which heated carbon dioxide-enriched air is captured and pumped into an adjacent greenhouse to boost composting and recycling in the City of Boston.

"By working together, we can make Boston one of the most sustainable and climate-resilient cities in the country,” said Mayor Walsh. “It starts with us, and this greenhouse is a part of our solution. I extend my gratitude to Public Works, Neighborhood Services and Environment, Energy & Open Space for continuing to make a positive impact on our community."

Mattapan Ecovation Center is a 2,800 square foot greenhouse that uses biological energy created from composted materials to help aide in the process and production of plants. The composting greenhouse will be used to recycle approximately 1,000 cubic yards of organic materials annually.

"This greenhouse establishes a national urban model that combines state and private funding with local resources and talent to address the effects and causes of climate change," said Bruce Fulford of City Soil.

This project was made possible through a grant award from the Urban Agricultural Program at the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) and the Suffolk County Conservation District. City Soil & Greenhouse contributed and secured more than $100,000 in materials and services to match the MDAR funds for the project.

As part of its Climate Action Plan, the City piloted Project Oscar in 2013, Boston’s first 24-hour community compost program. Named after the Sesame Street character, the Oscar compost bins provide members of the community an environmentally-friendly form of waste disposal.

Press Release - Mattapan Ecovation Center
Info page - Project Oscar